Category Archives: Office

Microsoft Ignite 2016 – Ready, Set, Connect

we-love-sharepoint - CopyOnePlace Solutions is proud to be an exhibitor and sponsor again this year at the Microsoft Ignite conference in Atlanta. Ignite is Microsoft’s premier conference this year for Office 365, SharePoint, Exchange, Azure, Windows and related technologies.

I’ll be on the OnePlace Solution booth (#563) during the conference talking about our suite of products that bring SharePoint and Office 365 to where you work such as Outlook, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Adobe Acrobat, and Windows Desktop.

CROSS_PLATFOMI’m very excited to be unveiling our latest product OnePlaceConnect at the conference. OnePlaceConnect is focused on bringing cloud based solutions such as Office 365 and SharePoint directly into the applications you use, on whatever device you use them (yes that means on your iPad/Android tablets, phones, Mac and of course your Windows devices).

 

Registration is now open to participate in the OnePlaceConnect Preview and be one of the first to get your hands on the new product.

 

The following are some really useful resources that I often refer people to at conferences.

OnePlaceMail – Intro video

OnePlaceDocs – Intro video

OnePlaceLive – Scenarios Unleashed (Project Management, Legal Matter Management)

OnePlaceLive – Email Tracking video

 

It’s always fun meeting new people at conferences and hearing of successes, challenges and battle wounds you’ve had with technology. It’s also awesome to catch up with existing customers and partners while I’m in the US as well, so please drop by the OnePlace Solutions booth if you get a chance.

We will have some swag at the booth, and we have new and improved hacky sacks/footbags/juggling balls to give away this conference. I’m more excited than I probably should be about those!

microsoft-band2We will also be giving away a Microsoft Band 2, so make sure you drop by for your chance to win.

Have a great conference and hope to see you at the booth or one of the many events.

cameron-dwyer-msauignite-2015-gold-coast

Reach out to me @CameronDwyer on Twitter during the conference.

 

 

MSIgnite_ATL_Twitter

How to access properties of Office.js objects that don’t exist in the Typescript definition file

When developing Office Add-ins and using Typescript, I’ve found the Office.js Typescript definition file available at DefinatelyTyped to only support a fraction of the objects and properties that are available within the Office.js library.

To give you an idea of what I mean, here is a list of properties that are available on the Office.context.mailbox.item object (according to the API documentation in the Outlook Dev Center)

clip_image004

 

And here are all the properties of that same object using the Typescript definition file:

image

I was left wondering where the rest of the properties were. They simply don’t exist in the Typescript definition file. So this leaves us in a bit of a bind, because we are using Typescript we can’t just reference a property that doesn’t exist in the Typescript definition file (even though we know the property will exist at run-time). The Typescript compiler will do it’s job well and throw up a compile time error that the property does not exist.

Without going to the effort of taking the Office.js Typescript definition file and extending it yourself to start filling it out you may want to consider the following work around.

We can declare an object in Typescript without a specific type by specifying it’s type as any. If we do this to an object within the Office.js library we can get an un-typed handle to the object. As the object in now un-typed, we can call any property of that object we like (whether it exists or not). Below is the code that will give us access to the subject of the email that is not available in the Typescript definition file.

image

If the property exists at runtime then great, if not then we will get a run-time error. It is definitely a step backwards and is why we use Typescript in the first place!

It would get a bit unwieldy if you used this technique throughout your code, and I’d like to think that as we get updated Office.js Typescript definition files that we can remove this type of code from our project and access the properties in a properly typed way. To isolate your use of this technique to a central location and facilitate removing the code later on, I’d suggest creating a class that takes in the object (e.g. Office.context.mailbox.item) then inside the class it gets the un-typed handle to the item and provides methods or properties that return the missing properties (with the bonus that the values returned can have a type associated with them). Below is an example of a class with static methods that provide typed access to missing properties on a mailbox item.

image

Hopefully the Office team will see the value in publishing current and complete Typescript definition files so we don’t have to write code like this in future.

Fingers crossed.

Getting the Angular 2 Router Working for an Office Addin

 

I have simple Angular 2 Office Addin and attempting to use the Angular 2 Router to route between two components. My two components are called ViewOne and ViewTwo.

Here’s what the UI for the Office Addin looks like:

office-addin-angular2-router-pushState-cameron-dwyer-01-addin-ui

When the using the Router to navigate, the following errors related to the this._history.pushState function are thrown to the JavaScript console

office-addin-angular2-router-pushState-cameron-dwyer-02-zone-js-error

The error message text is:

EXCEPTION: Error: Uncaught (in promise): TypeError: this_history.pushState is not a function

The same page displays without any error if it is not running as an Office Addin (rather if I just run the same router code on a standalone web page).

My best guess is that this error is due to the Office Addin framework and the fact that the Angular 2 app is running inside a sandbox iframe. I have tried running the same Angular app in a sandbox iframe on an otherwise generic html page however and I can’t reproduce the error so I think it is unique to something within the Office Addin framework.

This particular error has to do with the Angular 2 app trying to push the URL change to the web browsers history (to support back/forward navigation). In an Office Addin this doesn’t really make much sense as the Addin isn’t in control of the whole page so we wouldn’t want the Addin taking over the browsers URL history anyway.

In order to stop the Angular 2 router trying to make this call to the browser you can use a custom location strategy. In my case I was already using the HashLocationStrategy (rather than the default HTML5 routing strategy).

I went to the Angular 2 GitHub repo and found the source code for the HashLocationStrategy and created a new class in my Angular 2 app called CustomHashLocationStrategy. I just dumped all the source code into the new file, changed the name of the class and removed the two lines of code that try to update the web browsers history as shown below.

office-addin-angular2-router-pushState-cameron-dwyer-03-location-strategy

Now when bootstrapping my Angular 2 app I use my new CustomHashLocationStrategy instead of the HashLocationStrategy. Here’s what that change looks like in code.

Before (click for full size image):

office-addin-angular2-router-pushState-cameron-dwyer-04-bootstrap-before

After (click for full size image):

office-addin-angular2-router-pushState-cameron-dwyer-04b-bootstrap-after

After this change I can now navigate between the 2 routes without any errors being thrown to the console.

office-addin-angular2-router-pushState-cameron-dwyer-05-addin-ui-working

The code shown in this article in the Angular 2 Router in RC1. I also had the same issue using the “Router-Deprecated” in RC1, the same solutions worked for me using the deprecated router.

I also tested that this fix worked across Chrome, IE, Edge and Windows Desktop Office Client.

 

Further reading:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/36182807/angular-2-routed-apps-hosted-in-iframes

https://www.illucit.com/blog/2016/05/angular2-release-candidate-1-rc1-changes/

https://angular.io/docs/ts/latest/guide/router.html

Light up your Outlook Mailboxes with advanced Email Tracking features

I’m preparing to head down to Melbourne for the The Digital Workplace Conference (the new Australian SharePoint Conference). This will be the first conference since the 7.3 release of OnePlaceMail and OnePlaceLive. I’m pretty excited about the new Email Tracking features which goes well beyond simply allowing users to transfer email and attachment from Outlook to SharePoint. This goes to a whole new level. Save an email to SharePoint (or Office 365) and all other recipients of the email can see in real time that you have file it to SharePoint and can open up the location in SharePoint. No more having multiple people trying the file the same email to SharePoint to find that someone has already save it there. Or worse, people saving it to different locations in SharePoint and having the files duplicated.

If you haven’t checked out the OnePlace Solutions suite in the last few months you may have also missed the suggested and predictive email filing capabilities that analyze the filing patterns of users and will suggest or predict locations in SharePoint that are likely locations you would want to save the email. If you’re not going to make it to see us at the Melbourne conference (or simply can’t wait that long to see what I’m talking about) here’s a short video on the Email Tracking feature. See for yourself how just one feature can make the Digital Workplace so much easier for a user, then imagine a whole suite of products packed with features like this, then come and see me at the conference!

 

 

Outlook Add-in Ribbon Commands: Resolution to Manifest XML Schema Errors

While taking a look at the new Outlook Addin Ribbon Commands I came across these schema validation errors trying to deploy the addin once I added the VersionOverrides element. In particular I was getting this error message:

Failed to deploy the manifest file to the Exchange server.  This app can’t be installed. The manifest file doesn’t conform to the schema definition. The element ‘Resources’ in namespace ‘http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/mailappversionoverrides’ has invalid child element ‘Images’ in namespace ‘http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/officeappbasictypes/1.0′. List of possible elements expected: ‘ShortStrings, LongStrings’ in namespace ‘http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/officeappbasictypes/1.0′... The element ‘Resources’ in namespace ‘http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/mailappversionoverrides’ has invalid child element ‘Images’ in namespace ‘http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/officeappbasictypes/1.0′. List of possible elements expected: ‘ShortStrings, LongStrings’ in namespace ‘http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/officeappbasictypes/1.0′.

 

After a bit of trial and error I discovered that the issue was to do with the order of child elements within the Resources element. It appears that there is a strict order that must be adhered to.

Here’s the code that was causing the error. Notice that I was defining Urls before Images.

 

image

 

I simply swapped this around to define Images first, then Urls and the xml then passed the validation check and I was on my way. Here’s the working code:

image

 

Outlook 2016 – Use Case of Saving a File and Attaching to a new Email

This may just be the smallest and yet most appreciated new features of Outlook 2016. The attach file ribbon button has a dropdown that lets you select recent files saved from any other application. Sounds ridiculously simple, but in practice it is a real time saver.

Here’s the use case. I’m working on a file or I’m reading a file I’ve just downloaded from the internet and I want to send it to someone on an email.

Simply compose a new email and on the Attach File button dropdown the file will be the most recent file in the list. No need to even think about where it is saved, very slick.

image

Working with Non-Office File Types in SharePoint & Office 365

Office 365 and SharePoint work quite nicely when you are working with Microsoft Office file types. Things like Word, Excel and PowerPoint files. Once you really start using SharePoint however, you want to store many more types of files in SharePoint. This is natural and you can actually get the files into SharePoint without too much hassle.

Editing and working on Office file types is pretty good. Just click on the file in SharePoint and you can now choose to do the edits directly in the browser (with online versions of the Office products) or edit the files in the full desktop version of the Office products.

But what’s the story with file types that don’t open in, or are not associated with the Office products?

Well that’s when things get a little clunky, and in this post I’m going to show you how OnePlaceDocs Explorer turns virtually any software application into a “SharePoint” aware application that you can use to open/edit and save files that live in SharePoint. No longer are you just restricted to using the Office application that were designed to work with SharePoint, now you can edit files in any application you want.

So what is OnePlaceDocs Explorer? It is a bit like Windows File Explorer except it is purpose built for looking at SharePoint and Office 365 environments rather than files on your local computer or network.

To give you some orientation, the screenshot below shows OnePlaceDocs Explorer and points out the 3 pane layout which is similar to Windows File Explorer.

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-01-office-365-explorer-cameron-dwyer

 

Let’s look at a common scenario…

Editing Images Files in SharePoint/Office 365

It’s actually very difficult to edit image files that are stored in SharePoint. If you try to open the file, the web browser simply displays the image in the browser (because it natively knows how to). This doesn’t help you when you want to edit the image though. Your options are to either:

  • Download the image from SharePoint to your local computer, edit it in your image editing program of choice, then manually upload the file back to SharePoint replacing the existing file
  • Sync the whole library offline via OneDrive and then you can work with the file as though it is a normal file on your desktop. Saving changes to the local file will sync back to SharePoint.

Here’s the OnePlaceDocs Explorer way.

Select the image file and select Open With (from the ribbon or context menu action)

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-02-open-with-cameron-dwyer

Select any application from the list of applications installed on your computer that recognise this file type. I’ll choose good old Microsoft Paint just to prove that a very basic application that has no interoperability with SharePoint will work fine.

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-03-open-with-paint-cameron-dwyer 

Paint now starts up and the image stored in SharePoint is sitting there ready for me to edit.

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-04-open-with-paint-original-cameron-dwyer

I’ll make a few changes and just save using the standard save action in Paint or pressing CTRL+S.

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-05-open-with-paint-edited-awesome-cameron-dwyer

Believe it or not, that is it.

If we return to OnePlaceDocs Explorer we can see in the changes showing in the preview pane.

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-06-changes-in-preview-pane-cameron-dwyer 

Just to prove that it really has changed the file in SharePoint, I’ll open this document library in a web browser.edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-07a-open-in-browser-cameron-dwyer

We can then find the same file in SharePoint

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-07b-open-in-browser-cameron-dwyer

And there’s my modified image.

edit-files-directly-from-sharepoint-08-modified-file-in-sharepoint-cameron-dwyer

Editing the file using OnePlaceDocs Explorer really wasn’t any different to opening a file from my local computer. So now you have no excuse for not putting those files in SharePoint where they belong!

This same technique can be used to open any type of file with any installed application. Another common scenario is opening PDF files with Adobe Acrobat or another PDF authoring tool.

Does Microsoft have an InfoPath Forms Replacement in the Works

imageIt’s been one of the most asked questions since the death of InfoPath; What is InfoPath’s replacement?

There are some great 3rd party forms products that have been around for a long time now (namely Nintex and K2). Microsoft has been keeping very tight lipped on any official replacement to InfoPath and Forms in general and the community has been left feeling like they had been abandoned by Microsoft by not providing any replacement for their investment in InfoPath.

In a Office 365 Developer Podcast this week Jeremy Thake makes some very interesting comments (in the last 5 minutes of the podcast) indicating that Microsoft have been working on an InfoPath forms replacement it’s just been running way behind schedule. Interestingly he points to the technology behind Project Sienna possibly being an eventual replacement for InfoPath.
https://blogs.office.com/2015/07/16/office-365-developer-podcast-episode-054-panel-discussion-on-sharepoint-development/

This podcast also mentions that we may hear (and see) something more official announced in October. Could this be the news that everyone has been waiting for? That Microsoft will have an official replacement for InfoPath. Let’s hope so. SharePoint (and Office 365) as a platform really need a rich forms technology at it’s core. Businesses look to SharePoint to replace those paper based workflows within the organisation so it’s kind of important to have a Forms technology natively within SharePoint to facilitate that wouldn’t you think?

Preparing for Microsoft Ignite 2015

office-graph-ignite-sharepoint-office365-cameron-dwyerThe excitement is starting to build as the Microsoft technology conference of the year is almost upon us. I feel this year is going to be a first time experience for all attendees. We’ve got many individual conferences combined into one, even the old timers that have been attending these individual conferences year after year may be feeling some renewed excitement and feelings of trepidation of just how this conference is going to play out.

It’s certainly going to get started with a bang as Satya Nadella takes the stage for the keynote to an event that sold out weeks ago. I think the last time we saw a Microsoft CEO take the stage at a SharePoint conference was 5 years ago at SPC2010 when Steve Ballmer was at the helm.

Although Microsoft has gone (almost) all in on the cloud and been pushing cloud at us from every angle over the last few years, I think we will be hearing the word HYBRID quite a bit at this conference. We can also expect to hear a lot more about what SharePoint 2016 will look like and the feature set we can expect out of SharePoint 2016 on premises installations.

During the conference you’ll be able to find me at the OnePlace Solutions booth #537 in the Exhibition Hall. We will be running live, interactive demos of OnePlaceMail, as well as two new products that we are launching at the conference OnePlaceDocs and OnePlaceLive. Email management, Document management, and driving a solution focused, end user engagement for systems built on the SharePoint/Office 365 platform is what we’re about – if that sounds interesting then come by and meet the OnePlace Solutions Team. We will have plenty of giveaways as well so make sure you stop by to claim yours.

oneplacesolutions-ignite-conference-2015-cameron-dwyer

If you want to get the most out of mingling and networking then be sure to check out these two great resources for all those official and unofficial parties (great work guys on compiling these lists as they are quite extensive):

Vlad Catrinescu’s Blog – The Ultimate Microsoft ignite Party List

Jonathan McKinney’s Blog – The Unofficial Microsoft Ignite Party and Contest/Giveaway List

The Microsoft Ignite Countdown show is also well worth a watch to get a feel for how the conference will run, things to do in Chicago and it’s a bit of a laugh at the same time.

If you haven’t already then make sure you are keeping an eye on the #msignite hashtag on Twitter and the Ignite Event group in the Office 365 Yammer Network.

I hope to see you at the conference and above all have fun and despite what you were told as a child, talk to strangers (as long as they have an Ignite badge!)

 

Office Lens: The simple and free way to create an Outlook Contact from a business card

I’ve found Office Lens to be an awesome app for Windows Phone. Recently the app was enhanced to allow for the specific task of scanning business cards.

So how does it work? Simply fire up the free Office Lens app on your Windows Phone and tell it you want to scan a business card. Take the photo (scan) and save it to OneNote. Here’s what I ended up with when I scanned my own business card.

office-lense-scan-business-cards-cameron-dwyer-01-onenote

In OneNote (either directly on the phone or back on your PC – once OneNote syncs) you get the full picture of the business card at the bottom of the OneNote page, but it creates a section of formatted text above the image which extracts the main details from the business card and creates hyperlinks to call, email or open website addresses. Pretty cool.

The awesomeness doesn’t stop there. Embedded in the OneNote page is a .vcf file “BizCard”.

office-lense-scan-business-cards-cameron-dwyer-01-open-business-card

Click on the “BizCard” file and a full Outlook Contact profile is composed with all the details filled out ready to save.

office-lense-scan-business-cards-cameron-dwyer-03-create-new-outlook-contact-from-business-card

The screenshots above are from OneNote Desktop on my PC, but you get similar functionality directly on your phone. You can see the “BizCard” link and pressing it composes a new contact directly on your phone with all the details filled out which you can then edit/change before saving. Now that is really cool.

I’m looking forward to the next SharePoint Conference when I come home at the end of the day with a wad of business cards in my pocket.

Here’s an official article about the feature

http://blogs.office.com/2014/12/08/office-lens-gets-networking-scan-business-cards-onenote-contacts-outlook

You can download the Office Lens Windows Phone app for free from the Windows Phone Store.

%d bloggers like this: